In my last post about redesigning the Awyr site, I mentioned using rwasa to serve the content.

I found rwasa via an HN thread for one of their other projects, hnwatch. It was possibly a very canny bit of marketing, definitely appealing to the general userbase of HN.

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Over the past few months I’ve been involved with securing a number of legacy (old and/or unmaintained) CMS sites. Some were based on well-known CMS, including Wordpress, Plone, and Joomla, but there were several lesser-known examples too.

While some clients require the functionality a CMS provides, for example allowing non-privileged users access to a web-based interface for adding and editing content, there are a number who used them simply to set up a website that was then left in that “finished” state.

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We recently completed setting up a proof-of-concept platform-as-a-service (PaaS) based on RedHat’s OpenShift Origin.

The client wanted to trial a PaaS setup without fear of releasing their application source code to the wider world, so RedHat’s own OpenShift hosted service was out of the question! As such, we set up a CentOS-based server running OpenShift Origin for their internal network. Noone outside can use or even see the service, so their testing and source remains under tight control.

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We set up a server for a client to enable a rapid web development process. Files checked in to SVN are automatically deployed to the web server, so considerably boosting the speed of the testing process.

The client required a method of allowing a distributed team of developers to collaborate on the development of a gallery website. The developers also needed to be able to easily test their changes both against the data already on the site and against changes made by other team members. As such, a single web server which mirrored the content of the production site was set up.

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We developed a bespoke timetabling application for a school with non-mainstream requirements. The platform chosen was Microsoft Access due to its rapid development process and ease of use on the client’s system.

The timetabling process had to be flexible enough to allow staff to be assigned roles depending on the class. Each class only required a list of pupils, rather than a full enrolment system. The software also allows a timetable to be printed for each class and for each member of staff.

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